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Know Where It Goes Campaign

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Radio & TV

Outdoor

Exhibit

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Generic Radio Public Service Anouncements (PSAs)

Scripts

Audio Files (MP3s)

Speaking Points - Basic

Press Release

Generic Update

Milestone Announcement

Special Event

Power Point Show (in PDF)

Feature Stories

Autumn and Stormwater

Background

Beach Blahs

By The Numbers

Green Building

Kids Education (PDF)

Rain Gardens

Stormwater, Mosquitoes & You

Think Your Home Is Safe From Flooding?

Who Owns the Stormwater?

Who Pays For Stormwater?

Documents to Download

Public Service Anouncement

Scripts
When it rains, stormwater pollution carries dirt, oil, fertilizer, soap, pet waste litter and other harmful items to local creeks, streams and rivers (bays or ocean). Storm drains carry untreated water directly to creeks and lakes. Don’t let polluted stormwater hurt wildlife or increase water treatment costs. Pick up after pets, recycle used oil and don’t litter. When you pollute your water, you pollute yourself.

Did you know stormwater pollution is the number one source of water pollution in North Carolina? When it rains, storm drains carry untreated water and whatever the water picks up directly to creeks, lakes and rivers. If you like to fish, swim or boat, do your part to keep North Carolina’s waters clean. Pick up after pets, don’t litter, recycle used oil. To learn how you can prevent stormwater pollution, visit www.stormwater.org. When you pollute your water, you pollute yourself.

When it rains, stormwater pollution carries dirt, oil, fertilizer, soap, pet waste litter and other harmful items directly to local creeks, streams and lakes. Stormwater pollution harms water and the wildlife that live there. If you like to fish, swim or boat, pick up after your pet, recycle used oil and don’t litter. When you pollute your water, you pollute yourself.

When it rains, storm drains carry untreated water directly to creeks and lakes. Protect your water and the wildlife that live there. Sweep up excess fertilizer, wash your car on the grass instead of pavement so the water soaks into the ground and pick up after your pets. When you pollute your water, you pollute yourself.

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Audio Files (MP3s)

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Press Release – Generic Update
YOUR CITY — Efforts to reduce stormwater pollution in (your area) are going on as a result of federal mandates connected to the Clean Water Act. Polluted runoff occurs when rain, snowmelt or some other water source picks up pollutants like sediment, oil, pet waste, litter, soaps and fertilizers and carries them to the nearest creek, stream, river or ocean. Stormwater does not receive any treatment before it enters the nearest body of water.

Stormwater pollution in North Carolina has caused shellfish beds to close, swimming advisories, beach closings and has increased the cost of water treatment. Because it is easier to prevent pollution than clean it up later, most efforts focus on preventing pollutants from entering the stormwater system.

Development increases the amount of pavement, roofs, streets and other surfaces that water cannot penetrate. This decreases the amount of rain that can seep into soils and increases the amount and velocity of stormwater in urban areas; localized flooding can result. Some areas may take steps to reduce the amount and velocity of stormwater. Detention ponds, parking lot filter strips, rain gardens, green roofs and other measures — often called best management practices, or BMPS — are used to address this aspect of the stormwater problem.

Many of the things we do every day are potential sources of stormwater pollution. Residents will be asked to make some changes to reduce the pollutants each of us contributes to our area’s streams, lakes and rivers. Pick up after pets, wash cars on grass instead of pavement, never dump anything in storm drains, plant bare spots in lawns to reduce erosion and position gutters away from paved surfaces: these are just a few steps that can greatly reduce the amount of pollution carried in stormwater.

Public service announcements, workshops, public presentations and a Web site (www.xxx.xxx) are being prepared to inform about the new effort. (Your area), which contains Z square miles is located within the X river basin, and includes the (list major
water bodies here). To learn more about polluted stormwater runoff and the efforts (your town) are making, please call (your contact number).

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Press Release – Milestone/Announcement
YOUR CITY- (Your area) has recently mapped its stormwater system, which measures
X miles. To improve stormwater management in (your area), the following steps have
been taken. (List what occurred and when and state the public benefit here. If appropriate, include cost.)

Efforts to reduce stormwater pollution in (your area) began in 2004 as result of federal mandates connected to the Clean Water Act. Polluted runoff occurs when rain,
snowmelt or some other water source pick up pollutants like sediment, oil, pet waste,
litter, soaps and fertilizers where they are carried to the nearest creek, stream, river or ocean. Stormwater does not receive any water treatment before entering the nearest
body of water.

In (Your area), which contains Z square miles is located within the X river basin, and includes the (list major water bodies here). Stormwater pollution in North Carolina has caused shellfish beds to close, swimming advisories, beach closings and increased the cost of water treatment. (Cite when, where and the pollutant concerned if any local stormwater related closings occurred.)

Because people are the primary source of stormwater pollution, (Your town) residents have been asked to pick up after pets, wash cars on grass instead of pavement, never dump anything in storm drains and position gutters away from paved surfaces. (List local measures here, if any from previous PSAs or events).

To learn more about polluted stormwater runoff in (your town) and how it affects the (your local water bodies, visit (your Web site URL) or call (your contact number).

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Press Release – Event
YOUR CITY- To reduce stormwater pollution, the (name of sponsoring group) will hold an (event name — stencil, beach clean, stream clean, contest) at (specific location) on (day) from (begin time) to (end time). To participate, (describe sign up procedure and any restrictions such as age, physical condition here).

The event will (state benefit or output) in the (state areas receiving benefit — be sure to
think ‘downstream’).

Efforts to reduce stormwater pollution in (your area) began in 2004 as result of federal mandates connected to the Clean Water Act. Polluted runoff occurs when rain, snowmelt or some other water source pick up pollutants like sediment, oil, pet waste, litter, soaps and fertilizers where they are carried to the nearest creek, stream, river or ocean. Stormwater does not receive any treatment before it enters the nearest body of water.

In (Your area), which contains Z square miles, is located within the X river basin and includes the (list major water bodies here). Stormwater pollution in North Carolina has caused shellfish bed closures, swimming advisories, beach closings and increased the cost of water treatment. (Cite when, where and the pollutant concerned if any local stormwater-related closings occurred.)

Because people are the primary source of stormwater pollution, (Your town) residents have been asked to pick up after pets, wash cars on grass instead of pavement, never dump anything in storm drains and position gutters away from paved surfaces. (Event name) on (date) is just another measure (your city/town) is taking to reduce the impact of polluted stormwater runoff).

To learn more about polluted stormwater runoff in (your town) and how it affects the (your local water bodies), visit (your Web site URL) or call (your contact number).

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Feature – Article
Polluted stormwater runoff is the number one source of water pollution in the United States, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. It is also the number one threat to North Carolina’s water quality.

Stormwater is rainwater or snowmelt that, instead of sinking into the earth, ‘runs off’ via gutters, storm drains and ditches into creeks, streams, rivers, lakes and the ocean. Pollutants like excess fertilizer, oil, eroded dirt, pet waste, soap, pesticides and other chemicals are picked up by the runoff and carried untreated to local water bodies. The primary source of these pollutants is people.

In North Carolina, 364,732 acres of shellfish beds have been closed. Polluted stormwater runoff has also caused or contributed to swimming advisories, fishing advisories and beach closings. Financial impacts include job losses, tourism and recreation dollars and increased water treatment costs.

But stormwater runoff quality is one half of the stormwater picture; the quantity of stormwater runoff poses its own problems. Increased development brings more streets, parking lots, roofs and other surfaces that shed water instead of absorbing it. One inch of rain falling on a one-acre parking lot produces 16 times more runoff than the same inch of rain falling on a one-acre meadow. Localized urban flooding, erosion and scouring of streambeds are some impacts from increased stormwater runoff quantity.

North Carolina has 17 river basins, 320 miles of beach, the nation’s second largest estuary - the Albemarle - Pamlico sound - and more than 4,000 miles of estuary and shoreline that drain to the Atlantic. Shell fishing – once a coastal economic engine – has declined. Of the state’s approximately 2.1 million acres, 18 percent have been closed. Only one percent of the areas closed were not impacted by stormwater runoff pollution. Closed shellfish areas equal 569 square miles, an area larger than Wayne County. (Source: NCDENR, Environmental Health).

Most people are unaware that making a few changes in their daily life would tremendously reduce the amount of pollutants they contribute to stormwater runoff. A nationwide survey found 80 percent are unaware that storm drains carry untreated water directly to local creeks and streams (Source: Roper Report 2000).

Picking up after pets, not over fertilizing lawns, regular septic maintenance, not washing cars on driveways and turning downspouts away from paved areas are just a few changes. Business and industry can take steps to reduce erosion, limit the amount of chemicals left vulnerable to rain and find ways to construct buildings, often referred to as low impact development, to reduce the amount of impervious surfaces created by development.

Because stormwater runoff pollution comes from a wide variety of sources, it will take efforts on the part of residents, industry and government to address the problem. To learn more about polluted stormwater runoff, visit the N.C. Department of Environment and Natural Resources Web site, www.ncstormwater.org or your local county or city Web site.

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By The Numbers

Acres of North Carolina shellfish beds closed due to bacterial problems made worse by polluted stormwater: 364,538

Size of closed shellfish bed area: 569 square miles (size of Wayne County)

Phase II cities in North Carolina: 132

Tons of soil saved from erosion in Neuse River Basin through agricultural stormwater BMPs 1996-2004: 520,000 tons. That’s enough dirt to fill the Empire State building 3 and one-quarter times!
Source: 2005 319 Annual Report

Percent goal of nitrogen reduction in Neuse established 1998: 30

Percent of nitrogen reduction achieved in Neuse by 2004: 42 (estimate, based on agriculture BMPS in Neuse basin)

Swimming advisories issued by N.C. DEH in 2006: 27

Number of “beach days” affected by 2006 advisories in North Carolina: 224 days
(18 sites)

Average coastal rainfall (in inches) per year: approximately 55

Highest annual rainfall, per location, in North Carolina: 86.95 inches - Highlands Plateau

Miles of North Carolina freshwater streams impaired by stormwater: 930

Gallons of water one quart of oil can contaminate: one million

Average quarts waste oil produced by U.S. citizens in a lifetime: 48

Percent dog owners who “pick up” after their dog: 40 percent

Millions of fecal coliform bacteria in one gram of dog waste: 23

Percent non-human fecal coliform found in urban stormwater: 95 percent

Percent NC dog owners who ‘pick up’ after their dog:
35% in urban areas
24% in suburban areas
27% in rural areas

Pounds of dog waste produced daily in Forsyth, Guilford and Randolph counties, combined: 30,000

Gallons of water falling on one acre during a one-inch rainfall: 27,200

Difference in runoff magnitude when a one-inch rainfall lands on an acre of meadow or parking lot: Generally 16 times
Source: Center for Watershed Protection

Percent of lawns receiving regular fertilization nationwide: 70 percent

Pounds of nitrogen lawns receive when grass clippings are left on a one-acre yard for one year: 235

Pounds of phosphorus leaving grass clippings on one-acre lawn can provide in one year: 77 pounds

Pounds of active pesticide applied to lawns in U.S. annually: 70 million

Pounds of nitrogen discharged to groundwater by properly operating septic system, per person: 10

Percent land deemed “urban” in North Carolina: 10.5 percent

Percent of impervious cover (e.g. parking lots, roofs, roads) where stream quality sharply declines: < 10%

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